Calveley

Calveley
This unusual name is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is a locational surname deriving from the place called Calveley in Cheshire, north west of Crewe. The placename is recorded as "Calueleg" in the Chartulary of the Abbey of St. Werburgh, Chester, in circa 1235, and as "Calveleye" in the County Court, City Court and Eyre Rolls of Chester of 1287. The name means "pasture for calves", derived from the Olde English pre 7th Century "calf, cealf", calf, with "leah", in the specialized meaning of meadow, pasture-land; the usual sense is an open place in a wood, a glade. In some instances, the surname Calveley may be a variant form of the name Calverley, which derives from a place so called in Yorkshire, or from Calverleigh in Devonshire. A notable bearer of the name was Sir Hugh de Calveley (deceased 1393), who commanded the "free-lances" in the war with Brittany, 1341 - 1364, and joined the Black Prince in 1367; after a long and distinguished career he founded a college at Bunbury in Cheshire, in 1385. Recordings of the name from Cheshire Church Registers include the marriage of Roger Calveley and Margrett Lowe, on September 26th 1619, at Prestbury. A Coat of Arms granted to the family depicts a red fesse between three black calves on a silver shield. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Christiana de Kalverle, which was dated 1216, in the "Northumberland Book of Fees", during the reign of King Henry 111, known as "The Frenchman", 1216 - 1272. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

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  • Calveley — is a village (at SJ 591 589) and civil parish in the Crewe and Nantwich district of Cheshire, England. The village lies 5½ miles to the north west of Nantwich. The parish also includes parts of the settlements of Barrets Green and Wardle Bank.… …   Wikipedia

  • Hugh Calveley — Sir Hugh Calveley [His name is variously spelled Calverley, Caverle, Calvelegh, Kerverley, Calverlee, Calvyle, Kalvele, Calviley, and Calvile.] (died 23 April 1393 or 1394) was an English soldier and commander, who took part in the Hundred Years… …   Wikipedia

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  • Grange Calveley — is a British cartoonist and writer, best known mainly for creating the famous cartoon series Roobarb (1974) and its 2005 revival series Roobarb and Custard Too , as well the lesser known Noah and Nelly in the SkylArk (1977).The canine character… …   Wikipedia

  • Hugues Calveley — Hugues de Calveley Hugues de Calveley, naquit dans le comté de Cheshire et mourut en 1393. A la tête des archers anglais, il se distingua à la bataille de Poitiers le 19 septembre 1356. Lors de la guerre de succession du duché de Bretagne, il… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Hugues De Calveley — Hugues de Calveley, naquit dans le comté de Cheshire et mourut en 1393. A la tête des archers anglais, il se distingua à la bataille de Poitiers le 19 septembre 1356. Lors de la guerre de succession du duché de Bretagne, il combattit Charles de… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Hugues de calveley — Hugues de Calveley, naquit dans le comté de Cheshire et mourut en 1393. A la tête des archers anglais, il se distingua à la bataille de Poitiers le 19 septembre 1356. Lors de la guerre de succession du duché de Bretagne, il combattit Charles de… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Hugues de Calveley — Hugues de Calveley, naquit dans le comté de Cheshire et mourut en 1393. A la tête des archers anglais, il se distingua à la bataille de Poitiers le 19 septembre 1356. Lors de la guerre de succession du duché de Bretagne, il combattit Charles de… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Cholmondeston — Coordinates: 53°08′N 2°34′W / 53.13°N 2.56°W / 53.13; 2.56 …   Wikipedia

  • St Boniface's Church, Bunbury — St Boniface s Church, Bunbury, from the northwest …   Wikipedia

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