Lumber

Lumber
This most interesting surname may derive from two possible sources. Firstly, it may be of Anglo-Saxon origin, and a locational name from Great and Little Limber, in Lincolnshire, which was recorded as "Lindbeorhge", circa 1067 in the Anglo-Saxon Wills and "Linberge" in the Domesday Book of 1086. The placename is composed of the Olde English and Old Scandinavian "lind", lime-tree and the Olde English, Old Scandinavian element "beorg", hill, mountain. Alternatively, it may be a topographical name for "a dweller by a pool", from the Olde English "lum(m)", pool, plus the suffix "-er", which usually means "dweller by" when attached to some topographical term. Locational names were originally given to the Lord of the Manor or as a means of identification to those who left their place of birth to seek work, while topographical surnames were among the earliest created since both natural and man-made features provided easily recognisable distinguishing names in the Middle Ages. Houward Lomb was recorded in the Feet of Fines of Norfolk in 1198. Avis, daughter of Henry Lumber, was christened in 1611 at St. Margaret's, Westminster, and Margaret Lumbers was christened on April 4th 1698 at St. Ann and St. Agnes, London. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of John Lvmbar, which was dated November 20th 1598, a christening witness at St. Giles, Cripplegate, London, during the reign of Queen Elizabeth 1st, known as "Good Queen Bess", 1558 - 1603. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

Игры ⚽ Нужно решить контрольную?
Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Lumber — Lum ber, n. [Prob. fr. Lombard, the Lombards being the money lenders and pawnbrokers of the Middle Ages. A lumber room was, according to Trench, originally a Lombard room, or room where the Lombard pawnbroker stored his pledges. See {Lombard}.] 1 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • lumber — lumber1 [lum′bər] n. [< ? LOMBARD: orig., pawnbroker s shop or storeroom, hence pawned articles in storage, hence stored articles, hence lumber] 1. miscellaneous discarded household articles, furniture, etc. stored away or taking up room ☆ 2.… …   English World dictionary

  • Lumber — Lum ber, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Lumbered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Lumbering}.] 1. To heap together in disorder. Stuff lumbered together. Rymer. [1913 Webster] 2. To fill or encumber with lumber; as, to lumber up a room. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • lumber — lum‧ber [ˈlʌmbə ǁ ər] noun [uncountable] wood that has been prepared for sale; = TIMBER: • The company operates 50 lumber and building material retail stores. * * * lumber UK US /ˈlʌmbər/ noun [U] NATURAL RESOURCES ► TIMBER( …   Financial and business terms

  • lumber — [v1] walk heavily, clumsily barge, clump, galumph, lump, plod, shamble, shuffle, slog, stump, trudge, trundle, waddle; concept 151 Ant. glide lumber [v2] burden charge, cumber, encumber, impose upon, lade, land, load, saddle, tax, weigh; concept… …   New thesaurus

  • Lumber — Lum ber, v. i. 1. To move heavily, as if burdened. [1913 Webster] 2. [Cf. dial. Sw. lomra to resound.] To make a sound as if moving heavily or clumsily; to rumble. Cowper. [1913 Webster] 3. To cut logs in the forest, or prepare timber for market …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Lumber — Lumber, so v.w. Fettgans …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • lumber — *stumble, trip, blunder, lurch, flounder, galumph, lollop, bumble …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • lumber — ► VERB ▪ move in a slow, heavy, awkward way. ORIGIN perhaps symbolic of clumsy movement …   English terms dictionary

  • Lumber — Timber redirects here. For other uses, see Timber (disambiguation). Timber in storage for later processing at a sawmill …   Wikipedia

  • lumber — {{11}}lumber (n.) timber sawn into rough planks, 1660s, Amer.Eng. (Massachusetts), earlier disused bit of furniture; heavy, useless objects (1550s), probably from LUMBER (Cf. lumber) (v.), perhaps influenced by Lombard, from the Italian… …   Etymology dictionary

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”