Gloves

Gloves
Recorded in several forms including Glavis, Glewiss, Glaves, Gluvias, Gluyas, Gluyus, and possibly Gloves, this unusual surname is English, or at least it has been in some spellings since the Middle Ages. It is almost certainly a development of the Old French word 'gleyve' meaning a lance or spear, and as such was probably introduced by the Normans after the Invasion of 1066. The name may describe a 'lancer', a horse soldier who carried a lance, but it may equally have been a prize awarded to a sportsman. A lance would be set up to denote the end of a race, and was also the prize to the winner. The modern 'winning post' originated from this more simple method. Although we have no absolutely conclusive proof, we feel from the available known recordings, that the some descendants of the modern name holders may have been Huguenot Protestants fleeing from catholic repression, particularly in France, and from the 15th century. Some 50,000 of these people came to England, and over the centuries their name was in most cases, anglicised to 'sounds like' spellings. Examples of the surname developments include: William Glieve of Bedfordshire in the court rolls for the year 1227, and William Gleve of Suffolk in 1283. Later examples taken from surviving church registers include Jane Glaves, christened at St Katherines by the Tower (of London), on February 9th 1662, and Richard Gluvias, christened at St Sepulchre, in the city of London, on June 20th 1708. John Gluyas and his wife Susan had seven children christened at St Marks church, Kennington, London, between February 2nd 1845 and April 23rd 1865.

Surnames reference. 2013.

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  • gloves — glÊŒv n. protective covering for the hand (against cold, dirt, etc.); padded covering for the hand (worn in boxing and other sports) v. put gloves on; provide with gloves …   English contemporary dictionary

  • gloves — pirštinės statusas T sritis fizika atitikmenys: angl. gloves vok. Handschuhe, m rus. перчатки, f pranc. gants, m …   Fizikos terminų žodynas

  • gloves — pirštinės statusas T sritis Kūno kultūra ir sportas apibrėžtis Apmovai plaštakoms. Specialias pirštinės mūvi automobilininkai, boksininkai, dviratininkai, motociklininkai, ledo ritulininkai, beisbolininkai, fechtuotojai, slidininkai, alpinistai,… …   Sporto terminų žodynas

  • gloves — /glavz/ In England, it was an ancient custom on a maiden assize, when there was no offender to be tried, for the sheriff to present the judge with a pair of white gloves. It was an immemorial custom to remove the glove from the right hand on… …   Black's law dictionary

  • gloves — /glavz/ In England, it was an ancient custom on a maiden assize, when there was no offender to be tried, for the sheriff to present the judge with a pair of white gloves. It was an immemorial custom to remove the glove from the right hand on… …   Black's law dictionary

  • gloves are off — When the gloves are off, people start to argue or fight in a more serious way. ( The gloves come off and take the gloves off are also used. It comes from boxing, where fighters normally wear gloves so that they don t do too much damage to each… …   The small dictionary of idiomes

  • Gloves, Episcopal — • Liturgical gloves are a liturgical adornment reserved for bishops and cardinals Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006 …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • gloves-off — «GLUHVZ F, OF», adjective. Informal. with or as if with bare knuckles; harsh …   Useful english dictionary

  • Gloves (song) — Infobox Single Name = Gloves Caption = Artist = The Horrors from Album = Strange House A side = Gloves B side = The Horrors Theme Kicking K Death at the Chapel (Live) Released = February 26, 2007 Format = 7 vinyl, CD Recorded = Genre = Garage… …   Wikipedia

  • gloves are off —    When the gloves are off, people start to argue or fight in a more serious way. ( The gloves come off and take the gloves off are also used. It comes from boxing, where fighters normally wear gloves so that they don t do too much damage to each …   English Idioms & idiomatic expressions

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