Brick

Brick
Recorded as Brick, Bricke, Brik, the diminutives Bricket and Brickell, this is an English surname. It is either residential for someone who lived near a bridge, or an occupational name for a bridge keeper. The derivation is deriving from the Olde English pre 7th century word "brycg", meaning a bridge or causeway. It can also be an Ashkenazic name deriving from the Yiddish "brik," also meaning bridge. The surname is one of the earliest on recordd as shown below, whilst examples from surviving church registers include Jane Brik who married James Reade on August 24th 1626 at St. Andrews by the Wardrobe, in the city of London, and John Bricke who was christened on September 27th 1640 at St. Nicholas Cole Abbey, also city of London. William Brick, aged 30 years, was an Irish famine emigrant. He sailed from Liverpool aboard the appropriate ship called "Orphan" bound for New York. on May 1st 1846. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Gilbert atte Brigge. This was dated 1272 in the Names List of Surrey, during the reign of King Edward 1st, and known to history as the Hammer of the Scots, 1272 - 1307. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was sometimes known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

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  • brick — brick …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • BRICK — Apparu après 1750, le brick est un petit navire de guerre à voile, son importance étant désignée par le nombre de bouches à feu: brick de douze, de dix huit canons... Gréé en voiles latines sur deux mâts, il peut devenir un voilier très fin, le… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Brick — (br[i^]k), n. [OE. brik, F. brique; of Ger. origin; cf. AS. brice a breaking, fragment, Prov. E. brique piece, brique de pain, equiv. to AS. hl[=a]fes brice, fr. the root of E. break. See {Break}.] 1. A block or clay tempered with water, sand,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • BRICK —    Brick is a form of man made masonry that can be layered to enclose a space or held together with a mortar binder to create a structural support. Brick is made of a mixture of clay and sand, while the mortar is made of sand and a paste. The… …   Historical Dictionary of Architecture

  • Brick — bezeichnet: Brick (Film), US amerikanischer Thriller aus dem Jahr 2005 Brick (Band), US amerikanische Funk Jazz Band Brick ist der Familienname folgender Personen: Abraham L. Brick (1860–1908), US amerikanischer Politiker Martin Brick (* 1939),… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • BRICK — Cette page d’homonymie répertorie les différents sujets et articles partageant un même nom.  Pour les articles homophones, voir brik, brique et BRIC. Un brick est un type de bateau. Brick est un film de Rian Johnson sorti en …   Wikipédia en Français

  • brick — [brik] n. [ME brike < MDu < breken, BREAK (in sense “piece of baked clay”) & MFr brique < OFr, of same orig.] 1. a substance made from clay molded into oblong blocks and fired in a kiln or baked in the sun, used in building, paving, etc …   English World dictionary

  • brick — brick; brick·field·er; brick·ie; brick·le; brick·low; gold·brick; brick·ly; …   English syllables

  • Brick — Brick, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Bricked}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Bricking}.] 1. To lay or pave with bricks; to surround, line, or construct with bricks. [1913 Webster] 2. To imitate or counterfeit a brick wall on, as by smearing plaster with red ocher,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • brick|en — «BRIHK uhn», adjective. made of brick …   Useful english dictionary

  • brick|y — «BRIHK ee», adjective. 1. like brick in shape or color. 2. consisting or made of bricks …   Useful english dictionary

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