Sail

Sail
This interesting surname has three possible derivations. Firstly, it may derive from an early medieval occupational name for someone employed as a servant at the hall or manor house, from the Olde English, Anglo-Saxon "sael", hall (Middle English "sale"), reinforced by the Old French form "salle", introduced by the Normans after the Conquest of 1066. The second possibility is that it is either a topographical or locational name, from the Olde English "salh", a sallow tree, a low growing willow. The topographical form denotes residence by a sallow tree, while the locational name is from a place named with the word, such as Sale in Greater Manchester. Finally, the name may be of Old Scandinavian origin, as a topographical name for someone who lived by a pool, from the Old Norse "seyla", pool. Variants of the surname in the modern idiom include: Sale, Saile, Sails, Sailes and Salle. William Saylles is recorded in 1379, in the Poll Tax Records of Yorkshire. Recordings from London Church Registers include: the marriage of James Sale and Ann Burbery, on November 8th 1652, at St. Martin in the Fields; the marriage of John Saill and Anne Southall, on May 6th 1736, at Lincoln's Inn Chapel, Holborn; and the christening of John, son of Thomas and Sarah Saill, on September 13th 1748, at St. Sepulchre's, London. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Hugh de Sailes, which was dated 1219, witness in the "Assize Court Rolls of Yorkshire", during the reign of King Henry 111, known as "The Frenchman", 1216 - 1272. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

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  • Sail — Sail, n. [OE. seil, AS. segel, segl; akin to D. zeil, OHG. segal, G. & Sw. segel, Icel. segl, Dan. seil. [root] 153.] 1. An extent of canvas or other fabric by means of which the wind is made serviceable as a power for propelling vessels through… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • sail — [sāl] n. [ME seil, sail < OE segl, akin to Ger segel, prob. ult. < IE base * sek , to cut > L secare, to cut, segmentum, segment] 1. any of the shaped sheets of canvas or other strong material spread to catch or deflect the wind, by… …   English World dictionary

  • sail — ► NOUN 1) a piece of material extended on a mast to catch the wind and propel a boat or ship. 2) a wind catching apparatus attached to the arm of a windmill. 3) a voyage or excursion in a sailing boat or ship. ► VERB 1) travel in a sailing boat… …   English terms dictionary

  • Sail 8 — was an attempt at sailing protesters from Cherbourg in Northern France to Edinburgh in Scotland, as part of the 2005 Make Poverty History campaign. Taking place on 3 July 2005, the day after Live 8, the event was intended to be another aspect of… …   Wikipedia

  • Sail — Sail, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Sailed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Sailing}.] [AS. segelian, seglian. See {Sail}, n.] 1. To be impelled or driven forward by the action of wind upon sails, as a ship on water; to be impelled on a body of water by the action of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sail — Sail, v. t. 1. To pass or move upon, as in a ship, by means of sails; hence, to move or journey upon (the water) by means of steam or other force. [1913 Webster] A thousand ships were manned to sail the sea. Dryden. [1913 Webster] 2. To fly… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • sail — [v] travel through water, air; glide boat, captain, cast anchor, cast off, cross, cruise, dart, drift, embark, flit, float, fly, get under way*, leave, make headway, motor, move, navigate, pilot, put to sea*, reach, run, scud, set sail, shoot,… …   New thesaurus

  • sail — |a í| s. m. Óleo de peixe.   ‣ Etimologia: alteração de saim …   Dicionário da Língua Portuguesa

  • sail — vb float, skim, scud, shoot, dart, *fly …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • sail — sail, to put to sea; to begin a voyage To get ship under way in complete readiness for voyage, with purpose of proceeding without further delay …   Black's law dictionary

  • sail|er — «SAY luhr», noun. 1. a ship with reference to its sailing power: »the best sailer in the fleet, a fast sailer. 2. a sailing vessel …   Useful english dictionary

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