Hurl

Hurl
Recorded in many forms including Earl, Hurl, Harle, Hearle, Earle, Earles, Hurles and no doubt others, this is a surname of English pre 7th century origins. In its earliest form it indicated a freeman who was also a chief, and probably a successful warrior. Later after the Norman Invasion of 1066 it was introduced as an English rank of nobility, and seems to have been equivalent to the French rank of Count. However where it is recorded as a surname, it must be said that rarely were the original namebearers holders of the rank in question, although this may apply to the first nameholder. Surnames which appear to originate from the nobility are rarely what they seem, except in the case of Knight or Squire. These were terms that described a horse soldier. Those such as King, Queen, Prince, Earl and Bishop as examples, were given as an occupational name to an actor, one who played such a part in the popular travelling theatres or the annual pageants which wereheld in every town. The word 'earl' is probably from the Germanic 'jarl', although the same word in more or less the same spelling, is found in all early European languages. Early examples of the name recordings include Hervicus Herl of Cambridge in the year 1210, William Erl of Hampshire in 1230, and Hugh le Erl in the Fines Court of Suffolk county in 1255. On December 22nd 1679, Thomas Earls is listed as a landholder in the parish of Christchurch, Barbados, making him one of the earliest colonists in the New World. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Lefuin Eorl. This was dated 1095, in the records of the Abbey of Bury St. Edmunds, during the reign of King William 11nd, known as "Rufus", 1087 - 1100. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was sometimes known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

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  • Hurl — Hurl, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Hurled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Hurling}.] [OE. hurlen, hourlen; prob. contracted fr. OE. hurtlen to hurtle, or probably akin to E. whirl. [root]16. See {Hurtle}.] 1. To send whirling or whizzing through the air; to throw… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • hurl — [hə:l US hə:rl] v [Date: 1100 1200; Origin: Probably copying the action] 1.) [T always + adverb/preposition] to throw something with a lot of force, especially because you are angry ▪ Demonstrators were hurling bricks through the windows. ▪ He… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • hurl|y — hurl|y1 «HUR lee», noun, plural hurl|ies. commotion; hurly burly: »with the hurly, death itself awakes (Shakespeare). ╂[< hurl] hurl|y2 «HUR lee», noun, plural hurl|ie …   Useful english dictionary

  • Hurl — Hurl, v. i. 1. To hurl one s self; to go quickly. [R.] [1913 Webster] 2. To perform the act of hurling something; to throw something (at another). [1913 Webster] God shall hurl at him and not spare. Job xxvii. 22 (Rev. Ver. ). [1913 Webster] 3.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • hurl — hurl·bar·row; hurl·er; hurl·ey; hurl; …   English syllables

  • hurl´er — hurl «hurl», verb, noun. –v.t. 1. to throw with much force; cast; fling: »The man hurled his spear at one bear, and the dogs hurled themselves at the other. 2. Figurative. to throw forth (words, cries, or shouts) v …   Useful english dictionary

  • Hurl — Hurl, n. 1. The act of hurling or throwing with violence; a cast; a fling. Congreve. [1913 Webster] 2. Tumult; riot; hurly burly. [Obs.] Knolles. [1913 Webster] 3. (Hat Manuf.) A table on which fiber is stirred and mixed by beating with a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hurl — may refer to:* Hurley (stick) * Slang for vomiting * Hurl!, a reality show airing on G4 …   Wikipedia

  • hurl — (v.) early 13c., hurlen, to run against (each other), come into collision, later throw forcibly (c.1300); rush violently (late 14c.); perhaps related to Low Ger. hurreln to throw, to dash, and E.Fris. hurreln to roar, to bluster. OED suggests all …   Etymology dictionary

  • hurl — [hʉrl] vt. [ME hurlen, prob. of ON echoic orig. as in Dan hurle, to whir, Norw hurla, to buzz] 1. to throw or fling with force or violence 2. to cast down; overthrow 3. to utter vehemently [to hurl insults ] ☆ 4. Baseball Informal to pitch vi …   English World dictionary

  • hurl|ey — «HUR lee», noun, plural eys. 1. = hurling. (Cf. ↑hurling) 2. the stick or club used in hurling. ╂[< hurl] …   Useful english dictionary

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